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How to use Ice in the Jungle

Scenario: A pupil from another country has just joined your class.

Drastic changes in circumstances and environment are incredibly stressful ordeals, especially for children. A combination of uncertainty, loneliness and culture shock can cause anxiety.

The pupil will need reassurance that these feelings are only temporary and that in time they will adjust and make new memories. In Ice in the Jungle, Ice’s new friends throw a party for her to make her feel more at home. We can see that it helps her and that she is beginning to settle in to her new home. This process takes time, but reading Ice in the Jungle to the class may help the newcomer to understand that what they’re feeling is only temporary.

If they are happy to talk about the culture in which they grew up in, encourage them to share their experiences with their classmates, but do not force them to if they find it upsetting.

In Ice in the Jungle Ice discovers a banana for the first time, and thinks that it is the strangest fish that she has ever tasted! A new pupil may empathise with Ice if the snacks offered to them at school are completely different from what they are used to eating. Keep an eye on them and make sure they are eating properly.

If they bring food from home, be vigilant for any rude comments made by other pupils. In the rare event of someone being cruel, defend the meal by saying that you think it looks delicious. Home-cooked food may be comforting for the new pupil and they must not feel embarrassed if they want to eat something familiar to them.

Points to discuss after reading the book:
Why did Ice run from her classmates during her lunch break?
Do you think that her classmates were mean to her?
What would you say to Ice to make her feel better?

Further reading from the Child’s Play library:
The Red Boat– Shares the themes of moving somewhere new.
Come and Eat with Us/ Come Home with Us/ Come and Play with Us/ Come and Ride with us – The Discovery Flaps series depicts lots of different cultures from around the world.
Moving Day! – An introduction to moving house for the first time.
The Boy who Lost his Bumble – Teaches the value of patience and the idea that things can take time.

Scenario: You have noticed that a pupil is struggling to overcome shyness, and as a result, they spend a lot of time playing alone.

Ice in the Jungle can be used to encourage shy children to make friends. Ice manages to overcome her anxiety to approach her new classmates. She discovers that although they are different, she does not need to be intimidated by them.

Points to discuss after reading the book:
At one point, Ice runs away from her new classmates - why did she do that?
What would you say to Ice to encourage her to make friends?
If you were one of Ice’s new classmates, what would you do to help her feel less lonely?

Further reading from the Child’s Play library:
Momo and Snap – Shares the themes of making friends.
The Cloud – In this picture book, a girl befriends a lonely classmate who is struggling with negative thoughts.

Scenario: You would like to introduce your pupils to the idea of habitats.
It is rare to see a polar bear in a jungle! For older pupils, Ice in the Jungle can be used to highlight differences in the habitats found in nature.
Points to discuss after reading the book:
Ice has thick, white fur; discuss the way that she is most suited for living in the Arctic, where she is camouflaged and kept warm by her fur.
Look at Ice’s classmates and try to guess which continent she moves to.
Draw a line down the centre of the board and sort different animals into habitats which have ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ climates.

Further reading from the Child’s Play library:
Momo and Snap – This book is also set in a jungle.
Ocean Deep – Explore an ocean habitat.
Roly Poly Box books: Jungle and Snow – These pop-up books include an array of visual surprises relating to the Arctic, jungles and the animals that inhabit those areas.
Little Jungle Explorers – An interactive book which features animals that can be found in jungles.

Scenario: You would like to teach your class about different cultures.

Ice experiences quite a culture shock after moving far from her old home! With this in mind, the book can be used to introduce pupils to the different ways that people live all over the world.

Use examples in the text to stimulate a discussion about the following:

Food; Ice’s diet consists of fish and she does not encounter a banana until she moves to the jungle.
Ask your pupils if they have tried a new type of food lately.

Language: When Ice is surrounded by her new classmates, she does not understand a word they say.
Ask your pupils whether they know any words in other languages.
If they do not, teach them some basic words from other languages (e.g. “bonjour”, “hola” and “guten tag”)

Homes: Ice used to live in an igloo, but now she lives in a hut. Discuss the different types of houses that your pupils live in. Move on to talk about houses in different countries.

Further reading from the Child’s Play library:
Come and Eat with Us/ Come Home with Us/ Come and Play with Us/ Come and Ride with us – The Discovery Flaps series depicts lots of different cultures from around the world.


Click here for some printable Ice in the Jungle resources!

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